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Keywords = Perspective

  • Open Access Mini Review
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2018, 3(2), 75-81. http://doi.org/10.31586/Nursing.0302.03
    138 Views 120 Downloads PDF Full-text (2.583 MB) PDF Full-text (2.583 MB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    Genotype and lifestyle factors have been implicated as the causes of non-communicable diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic respiratory disease. Lifestyle factors constitute physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake and dietary habits. These factors alongside genetic factors have been studied over the past years on their relationships with non-communicable
    [...] Read more.
    Genotype and lifestyle factors have been implicated as the causes of non-communicable diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic respiratory disease. Lifestyle factors constitute physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake and dietary habits. These factors alongside genetic factors have been studied over the past years on their relationships with non-communicable diseases. This review examined and compared the strengths of the two factors, lifestyle and genotype, in causing non-communicable diseases. A search was done online, predominantly with PubMed, to identify articles that contained the keywords, lifestyle, diet, exercise, genotype, gene, non-communicable diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory disease, diabetes. For diabetes, the results of this review showed that management of lifestyle factors can be used to prevent type 2 diabetes among genetically predisposed persons. Cancers studies have suggested that a Mediterranean diet is associated with lower cancer risk for both genetically susceptible people and non-susceptible individuals. Similar findings were gotten for cardiovascular diseases and chronic respiratory diseases. The results suggest a strong impact of lifestyle-related factors as a cause of non-communicable diseases though genetic factors cannot be underestimated. With good management of lifestyle factors, non-communicable diseases can be prevented and the risks reduced even among genetically high-risk individuals.  Full article
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    Micha R, Pe?alvo JL, Cudhea F, Imamura F, Rehm CD, Mozaffarian D. Association between dietary factors and mortality from heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes in the United States. JAMA 317 (2017) 912-924.
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    Sorli-Aguilar M, Martin-Lujan F, Flores-Mateo G, Arija-Val V, Basora-Gallisa J, Sola-Alberich R. Dietary patterns are associated with lung function among Spanish smokers without respiratory disease. BMC Pulmonary Medicine 16 (2016) 162-173.
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    Sabater-Lleal M, M?larstig A, Folkersen L, Artigas MS, Baldassarre D, Kavousi M, Almgren P, et al. Common Genetic Determinants of Lung Function, Subclinical Atherosclerosis and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease. PLoS ONE 9 (2014) e104082.
  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2021, 5(1), 1-10. http://doi.org/10.31586/marketing501003
    25 Downloads PDF Full-text (809.398 KB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between marketing foundations related to customer satisfaction of the Refah Bank of West Azerbaijan Province from the perspective of managers and employees. The basics of relationship marketing include (trust, commitment, communication, conflict management and competency). The statistical population of this
    [...] Read more.
    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between marketing foundations related to customer satisfaction of the Refah Bank of West Azerbaijan Province from the perspective of managers and employees. The basics of relationship marketing include (trust, commitment, communication, conflict management and competency). The statistical population of this study is 190 managers and employees of the Refah Bank of West Azerbaijan Province, which was selected from 7 cities of the province using cluster classification method. The data collection tool in this study was a questionnaire and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Pearson correlation test and Friedman test were used to analyze the data. The results of this study show that there is a significant relationship between the foundations of relationship marketing and customer satisfaction and in terms of significance level, respectively, priority, competency (0.000), trust (0.001), and communication. (0.001), conflict management (0.004), commitment (0.005), has been related to customer satisfaction with bank services. Also, according to Friedman test, the variable of trust with an average of 4.09 is known as the most important factor.  Full article
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