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Keywords = Surgery

  • Open Access Case Report
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2018, 3(2), 96-103. http://doi.org/10.31586/Surgery.0302.06
    3 Views 6 Downloads PDF Full-text (2.387 MB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    Primary cardiac tumors are rare with an incidence ranging from 0.001% to 0.03% in autopsy series. The prognosis of cardiac sarcomas remains poor because it proliferates rapidly, and distant metastases are often found at diagnosis. We present a case of liposarcoma in the atrium of the heart as case report
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    Primary cardiac tumors are rare with an incidence ranging from 0.001% to 0.03% in autopsy series. The prognosis of cardiac sarcomas remains poor because it proliferates rapidly, and distant metastases are often found at diagnosis. We present a case of liposarcoma in the atrium of the heart as case report and same time,we do a literature review about it.Case Report: We present the case of a 30-year-old female with a significant tumor of cardiac liposarcoma, with chief complaint of dyspnea, tachycardia and heart failure even angina pectoris.Conclusion: The diagnostician?s differential diagnosis must be broad when encountering common chief complaints, such as tachycardia, heart failure and angina pectoris.  Full article
    Figures

    Figure 2 of 3

    References
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    Guilherme H. Oliveira, MD*; Sadeer G. Al-Kindi, MD*; Christopher Hoimes, DO; Soon J. Park, MD Characteristics and Survival of Malignant Cardiac Tumors A 40-Year Analysis of >500 Patients (Circulation. 2015;132:2395-2402. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.115.016418.)
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    Cristina Basso, Stefania Rizzo, Marialuisa Valente, Gaetano Thiene, Prevalence and pathology of primary cardiac tumours. Cardiovascular Medicine 2012;15(1):18?29
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    Vander Salm TJ.Unusual primary tumors of the heart. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg.2000 Apr;12(2):89-100.
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    Elizabeth S. Ellent, MD,1 Ronald Chong-Yik, MD, MPH,1,2 Abdul Mukhtadir Khan, MD3. Metastatic Cardiac Angiosarcoma in a 26-Year-Old Male. Ochsner Journal 16:324?328, 2016
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    Reynen K. Cardiac myxomas. N Engl J Med. 1995;33:1610?7.
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    Basso C, Bottio T, Valente M, Bonato R, Casarotto D, Thiene G. Primary cardiac valve tumours. Heart. 2003;89:1259?60.
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    Gowda RM, Khan IA, Nair CK, Mehta NJ, Vasavada BC, Sacchi TJ. Cardiac papillary fibroelastoma: a comprehensive analysis of 725 cases. Am Heart J. 2003;146:404?10.
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    Cunningham KS, Veinot JP, Feindel CM, Butany J. Fatty lesions of the atria and interatrial septum. Hum Pathol. 2006;37:1245?51.
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    Becker, Anton E. Primary heart tumors in the pediatric age group: a review of salient pathologic features relevant for clinicians. Pediatr Cardiol. 2000;21:317?23.
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    Padalino MA, Basso C, Milanesi O, Vida VL, Moreolo GS, Thiene G, Stellin G. Surgically treated primary cardiac tumors in early infancy and childhood. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2005;129:1358?63.
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    Kurian KK, Weisshaar D, Parekh H et al. Primary angiosarcoma: case report and review of the literature. Cardiovascular Pathology, 2006;15:110?2
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    Thiene G, Valente M, Lombardi M, Basso C. Tumours of the Heart. In: Camm JA, Luscher TF, Serruys PV, eds. ESC Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. Oxford: University Press; 2009.
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    Van Veer H, Meuris B, Verbeken E, Herijgers P. Primary atrial fibrosarcoma of the heart. Cardiovasc Pathol. 2008;17:325?8.
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    Basso C, Stefani A, Calabrese F, Fasoli G, Valente M. Primary atrial fibrosarcoma diagnosed by endocardial biopsy. Am Heart J. 1996;131:399? 402.
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    Mazzola A, Spano JP, Valente M, Gregorini R, Villani C, Di Eusanio M, et al. Leiomyosarcoma of the left atrium mimicking a left atrial myxoma. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2006;131:224?6.
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    Mazzucco A, Luciani GB, Bertolini P, Faggian G, Morando G, Ghimenton C. Primary leiomyosarcoma of the pulmonary artery: diagnostic and surgical implications. Ann Thorac Surg. 1994;57:222?5.
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    Burke AP, Rosada-de Christenson ML, Templeton PA, Virmani R. Cardiac fibroma: clinicopathologic correlates and surgical treatment. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1994;108:862?70
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    Warren WH. Malignancies involving the pericardium. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000;12:119?29.
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    Luk A, Ahn E, Vaideeswar P, Butany JW. Pericardial tumors. Semin Diagn Pathol. 2008;25:47?53.
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    Bendek M, Ferenc M, Freudenberg N. Post-irradiation pericardial malignant mesothelioma: an autopsy case and review of the literature. Cardiovasc Pathol. 2010;19:377?9.
    [40]
    Yoshiyuki Yamashita, Kazuhiro Kurisu, Satoshi Kimura, and Yasutaka Ueno. Successful resection of a huge metastatic liposarcoma in the pericardium resulting in improvement of diastolic heart failure: a case report. Surg Case Rep. 2015 Dec; 1: 74. Published online 2015 Sep 2. doi: 10.1186/s40792-015-0079-4
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    Conklin LD, Reardon MJ. Autotransplantation of the heart for primary cardiac malignancy: development and surgical technique. Texas Heart Institute Journal. 2002;29(2):105.
  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2015, 2(1), 39-45. http://doi.org/10.31586/Surgery.0201.05
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    Abstract
    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between operative approach, operative time, and SSI rate. Methods: Inpatient database review identified patients undergoing 5 common procedures from 1/2010-12/2011. Patients were stratified into laparoscopic or open approaches. The main outcome measure was the relationship between operative time and SSI by approach. Results: 226,006 patients
    [...] Read more.
    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between operative approach, operative time, and SSI rate. Methods: Inpatient database review identified patients undergoing 5 common procedures from 1/2010-12/2011. Patients were stratified into laparoscopic or open approaches. The main outcome measure was the relationship between operative time and SSI by approach. Results: 226,006 patients were evaluated- 28.2% open and 71.8% laparoscopic. Mean overall operative time was significantly shorter laparoscopically (p<0.001). Laparoscopy was associated with significantly lower costs and shorter length of stay (LOS) overall and for each procedure(p<0.0001). Multivariate analysis found SSI increased directly with operative time: for every 30-minute increase, SSI risk increased by 12%. Operative approach was an independent risk factor for SSI: open surgery increased SSI risk by 78%. A direct relationship between open procedures, operative time, and SSI risk was found. Conclusions: Laparoscopy has overall shorter operative time and improved outcomes in SSI rate, LOS, and total costs for common surgical procedures. As operative time and approach were independent risk factors for SSI, the use of laparoscopy and operative time are valuable quality measures.  Full article
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  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2015, 2(2), 73-75. http://doi.org/10.31586/Surgery.0202.04
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    Abstract
    The aneurysm is a complex phenomenon which is affected by different factors, such as the biological diseases and the blood flow parameters. The wall shear stress and pressure are the main factors in the establishment and growth of cerebral aneurysm. The circle of Willis is a prevalent location for aneurysm.
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    The aneurysm is a complex phenomenon which is affected by different factors, such as the biological diseases and the blood flow parameters. The wall shear stress and pressure are the main factors in the establishment and growth of cerebral aneurysm. The circle of Willis is a prevalent location for aneurysm. On the other hand, the anomalies of circle of Willis cause variations in flow field pattern and also the wall shear stress and pressure. In the present study, the effects of some anomalies in the flow pattern are investigated using three dimensional simulation of the Circle of Willis. The simulations are conducted using commercial ANSYS FLUENT. The obtained results show the major anomalies cause increase wall shear stress and pressure on the wall of circle of Willis. This factor can lead to increase the risk of aneurysm.  Full article
    Figures

    Figure 5 of 5

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  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2018, 3(3), 116-119. http://doi.org/10.31586/Surgery.0303.02
    39 Views 23 Downloads 1 Shares PDF Full-text (777.326 KB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    Introduction: Traumatic pulmonary parenchymal cavitary lesions (TPPCs) are pulmonary pseudocysts raiding secondary to lung contusion. Method: To provide an overview of the etiology, presentation, diagnosis and treatment of TPPCs, and to discuss this in the context of a cohort of 12 retrospectively reviewed patients with TPPCs presenting to Sahlgrenska University
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    Introduction: Traumatic pulmonary parenchymal cavitary lesions (TPPCs) are pulmonary pseudocysts raiding secondary to lung contusion. Method: To provide an overview of the etiology, presentation, diagnosis and treatment of TPPCs, and to discuss this in the context of a cohort of 12 retrospectively reviewed patients with TPPCs presenting to Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden, from January 2014 to December 2016. Between January 2014 and December 2016, a total of twelve trauma patients presented to Sahlgrenska University Hospital with TPPC following blunt trauma.Results: TPPCs are of limited clinical consequence. Inexperienced clinicians may treat these inappropriately. A Computed Tomography (CT) scan is the investigation of choice. Treatment is symptomatic. Intervention is indicated only in case of complications.  Full article
    Figures

    Figure 1 of 2

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  • Open Access Case Report
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2018, 3(3), 144-146. http://doi.org/10.31586/Surgery.0303.07
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    Abstract
    Central vein stenosis is a rare complication that occurs after central venous port placement. We report a case of chyle withdrawal from a central venous port in a patient receiving chemotherapy for stage IV rectal cancer. Dilated thoracic duct terminal and innominate vein stenosis both were clearly shown in the
    [...] Read more.
    Central vein stenosis is a rare complication that occurs after central venous port placement. We report a case of chyle withdrawal from a central venous port in a patient receiving chemotherapy for stage IV rectal cancer. Dilated thoracic duct terminal and innominate vein stenosis both were clearly shown in the angiography results, and innominate vein stenosis was resolved by performing percutaneous transluminal angioplasty.  Full article
    Figures

    Figure 2 of 2

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  • Open Access Case Report
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2018, 3(4), 147-150. http://doi.org/10.31586/Surgery.0304.01
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    Abstract
    Central venous devices are routinely used in delivering chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition. Spontaneous migration of central venous catheters is a very rare complication, but the etiology of this problem is not clear. We report here a case of migration of a port catheter to the anterior mediastinum in
    [...] Read more.
    Central venous devices are routinely used in delivering chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition. Spontaneous migration of central venous catheters is a very rare complication, but the etiology of this problem is not clear. We report here a case of migration of a port catheter to the anterior mediastinum in a patient with stage IVC nasopharyngeal cancer during chemotherapy. The patient presented with pulmonary manifestations in form of shortness of breath and chest tightness caused by left massive pleural effusion. The pleural effusion was resolved by thoracocentesis and the migrated catheter was retrieved surgically.  Full article
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