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Keywords = Food

  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2018, 3(1), 1-9. http://doi.org/10.31586/Biology.0301.01
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    Abstract
    Animals usually use photoperiod as an important environmental cue to time the year. In terms of the winter immunocompetence enhancement hypothesis, animals in the non-tropical zone would actively enhance their immune function to decrease the negative influence of stressors such as low temperature and food shortage in winter. In the
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    Animals usually use photoperiod as an important environmental cue to time the year. In terms of the winter immunocompetence enhancement hypothesis, animals in the non-tropical zone would actively enhance their immune function to decrease the negative influence of stressors such as low temperature and food shortage in winter. In the present study, we mimicked the transition from summer to winter by decreasing photoperiod gradually and examined the variations of immune repsonses in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) to test this hypothesis. Twenty two female adult hamsters were randomly divided into the control (12h light: 12h dark, Control, n=11) and the gradually decreasing photoperiod group (Experiment, n=11). In the experiment group, day length was decreased from 12 h: 12 h light-dark cycle to 8 h: 16 h light-dark cycle at the pace of half an hour per week. We found that gradually decreasing photoperiod had no effect on body composition (wet carcass mass, subcutaneous, retroperitoneal, mesenteric and total body fat mass) and the masses of the organs detected such as brain, heart, liver and so on in hamsters. Similarly, immunological parameters including immune organs (thymus and spleen), white blood cells and serum bacteria killing capacity indicative of innate immunity were also not influenced by gradually decreasing photoperiod, which did not support the winter immunocompetence enhancement hypothesis. However, gradually decreasing photoperiod increased phytohaemagglutinin response post-24h of PHA challenge, which supported this hypothesis. There was no correlation between cellular, innate immunity and body fat mass, suggesting that body fat was not the reasons of the changes of cellular immunity. In summary, distinct components of immune system respond to gradually decreasing photoperiod differently in Siberian hamsters.  Full article
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    Figure 2 of 3

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  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2015, 2(1), 21-38. http://doi.org/10.31586/AgriculturalEconomics.0201.04
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    Abstract
    Dispite intensive multidiciplinary research the overall impact of the March 2011 earthquake, tsunami and Fukushima nuclear accident on Japanese agri-food sector is far from being completely evalusated. That is a concequence of the scale of triple disaster and affected agents, the effects? multiplicities, spillovers, and long time horizon, the lack
    [...] Read more.
    Dispite intensive multidiciplinary research the overall impact of the March 2011 earthquake, tsunami and Fukushima nuclear accident on Japanese agri-food sector is far from being completely evalusated. That is a concequence of the scale of triple disaster and affected agents, the effects? multiplicities, spillovers, and long time horizon, the lack of ?full? information and models of analysis, on-going challenges with post disaster recovery and reconstruction, etc. This paper presents research findings on multiple impacts of the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami on Japanases agriculture and food sector. First, disaster events and their effects is outlined; next the impacts on agri-food organizations, products, markets and consumers are evaluated; finally, specific and overall short-term and long-term impacts on agriculture, food industries and food consumption in different parts of the country is assessed. The study is based on a wide range of information from diverse organizations as well as original experts assessments of leading experts in the area. Agriculture, food industry and food consumption have been among the worst hit by the disasters areas. There is a great variation of the specific and combined impacts of disasters on different type of farming and business enterprises, particular agents, individual sub-sectors, and specific locations. Disasters have also had positive impacts on the development of certain sectors in the most affected regions and some sectors in other parts of the country as post disaster reconstruction have induced considerable policies and institutional modernization in agri-food and other sectors, food safety information and inspection, technological and product innovation, jobs creation and investment, farmlands consolidation and enhancement, infrastructural amelioration, organizational restructuring, etc. More future studies are necessary to evaluate and update the ?known? agricultural and food impacts as further in depth ?micro? studies are needed to fully understand the impacts of the disasters in each location and community, type of farms and productions, and component of agri-food chain.  Full article
    Figures

    Figure 12 of 9

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  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2018, 3(3), 124-132. http://doi.org/10.31586/Biochemistry.0303.04
    71 Views 46 Downloads PDF Full-text (921.556 KB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    The bone health is an important part of healthy-life and longevity in current situation due to huge toxins and contaminants in the environment and food chain. Considering the importance of bone health in the modern era, the present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of the Consciousness Energy
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    The bone health is an important part of healthy-life and longevity in current situation due to huge toxins and contaminants in the environment and food chain. Considering the importance of bone health in the modern era, the present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of the Consciousness Energy Healing (The Trivedi Effect?) Treatment on Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) in which the human bone osteosarcoma cells - MG-63 (ATCC? CRL-1427?) was grown for the assessment of bone cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro. The study parameters were assessed using cell viability by MTT assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and collagen synthesis on bone health using ELISA-based assay. The cell viability was significantly increased by 24% in the Biofield Energy Treated group supplemented with 10% charcoal-dextran with fetal bovine serum (CD-FBS) (G3) compared to the untreated cells group (G1). The level of ALP was significantly increased by 72% in the G3 group compared to the G1 group. Additionally, the level of collagen synthesis was significantly (p?0.001) increased by 19% in the G3 group compared to the G1 group. The overall results demonstrated that the Biofield Energy Treated DMEM has the potential for bone mineralization and bone cells growth as evident via increased levels of collagen and ALP. Therefore, the Biofield Energy Healing (The Trivedi Effect?) Treatment could be useful as a bone health promoter for various bone-related disorders like low bone density, osteogenesis imperfecta, and osteoporosis, etc.  Full article
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