View options
Result details

Results per page
Articles per page View Sort by

2 results matched your search query
Keywords = HCC

  • Open Access Research Article
    Export citation: APA   BibTeX   EndNote   RIS  
    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2018, 3(4), 161-169. http://doi.org/10.31586/Biomedicine.0304.03
    54 Views 66 Downloads PDF Full-text (1.915 MB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most common malignant tumors, with rapid development and high malignancy. MicroRNAs have been reported to play important roles in hepatocellular carcinoma progression. Aim: To identify the key genes and miRNAs in HCC, and to explore their potential molecular mechanisms. Methods: Gene expression profiles
    [...] Read more.
    Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most common malignant tumors, with rapid development and high malignancy. MicroRNAs have been reported to play important roles in hepatocellular carcinoma progression. Aim: To identify the key genes and miRNAs in HCC, and to explore their potential molecular mechanisms. Methods: Gene expression profiles of GSE15471 (mRNA profile) and GSE57555 (miRNA profile) were downloaded from gene expression omnibus, which were analysed using R software and bioconductor packages. The gene ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichments of DEGs were performed using the DAVID database, and the protein–protein interaction networks of the DEGs were constructed from the STRING database. In addition, targets of differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted by the online resource miRDB. Result: In total, 191 differentially expressed genes were identified, including 142 upregulated and 49 downregulated genes. Functional analysis revealed that these DEGs were associates with wound healing, endodermal cell-cell adhesion, activation of MAPK activity and negative regulation of cell proliferation. In addition, we identified five DEMs, which were upregulated and downregulated. hsa-miR-122-5p may target the PDK4, and hsa-miR-21-5p probably targets SPOCK1 and PAIP2B. Conclusions: We applied integrated bioinformatics to identify key pathogenic genes involved in hepatocellular carcinoma and provide new clues for further studies of hepatocellular carcinoma.  Full article
    Figures

    Figure 4 of 4

    References
    [1]
    Feng Y, Zu LL, Zhang L. MicroRNA-26b inhibits the tumor growth of human liver cancer through the PI3K/Akt and NF-kappaB/MMP-9/VEGF pathways. Oncol Rep. 2018;39(5):2288-96.
    [2]
    Liu H, Cheng L, Cao D, Zhang H. Suppression of miR-21 Expression Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Migration of Liver Cancer Cells by Targeting Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN). Med Sci Monit. 2018;24:3571-7.
    [3]
    Grainger S, Traver D, Willert K. Wnt Signaling in Hematological Malignancies. Prog Mol Biol Transl Sci. 2018;153:321-41.
    [4]
    Setshedi M, Andersson M, Kgatle MM, Roberts L. Molecular and cellular oncogenic mechanisms in hepatocellular carcinoma. S Afr Med J. 2018;108(8b):41-6.
    [5]
    Kroemer G, Pouyssegur J. Tumor cell metabolism: cancer's Achilles' heel. Cancer cell. 2008;13(6):472-82.
    [6]
    Lu X, Kang Y. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors: master regulators of metastasis. Clin Cancer Res. 2010;16(24):5928-35.
    [7]
    Guo JR, Shen HC, Liu Y, Xu F, Zhang YW, Shao Y, et al. Effect of Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution Combined with Controlled Low Central Venous Pressure on Blood Coagulation Function and Blood Loss in Patients Undergoing Resection of Liver Cancer Operation. Hepatogastroenterology. 2015;62(140):992-6.
    [8]
    Sang L, Wang XM, Xu DY, Zhao WJ. Bioinformatics analysis of aberrantly methylated-differentially expressed genes and pathways in hepatocellular carcinoma. World J Gastroenterol. 2018;24(24):2605-16.
    [9]
    He JH, Han ZP, Wu PZ, Zou MX, Wang L, Lv YB, et al. Gene-gene interaction network analysis of hepatocellular carcinoma using bioinformatic software. Oncol Lett. 2018;15(6):8371-7.
    [10]
    Dang S, Zhou J, Wang Z, Wang K, Dai S, He S. MiR-299-3p functions as a tumor suppressor via targeting Sirtuin 5 in hepatocellular carcinoma. Biomed Pharmacother. 2018;106:966-75.
    [11]
    Wakasugi H, Takahashi H, Niinuma T, Kitajima H, Oikawa R, Matsumoto N, et al. Dysregulation of miRNA in chronic hepatitis B is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma risk after nucleos(t)ide analogue treatment. Cancer Lett. 2018;434:91-100.
    [12]
    Li Z, Xue TQ, Yang C, Wang YL, Zhu XL, Ni CF. EGFL7 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and inhibits cell apoptosis through increasing CKS2 expression by activating Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. J Cell Biochem. 2018;10.1002
    [13]
    Yan L, Xu F, Dai CL. Relationship between epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and the inflammatory microenvironment of hepatocellular carcinoma. J Exp Clin Cancer Res. 2018;37(1):203.
    [14]
    Pearson G, Robinson F, Beers Gibson T, Xu BE, Karandikar M, Berman K, et al. Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways: regulation and physiological functions. Endocr Rev. 2001;22(2):153-83.
    [15]
    Li D, Ren W, Jiang Z, Zhu L. Regulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and macrophage pyroptosis by the p38 MAPK signaling pathway in a mouse model of acute lung injury. Mol Med Rep. 2018.
    [16]
    Si L, Xu L, Yin L, Qi Y, Han X, Xu Y, et al. Potent effects of dioscin against pancreatic cancer via miR-149-3P-mediated inhibition of the Akt1 signalling pathway. Br J Pharmacol. 2017;174(7):553-68.
    [17]
    Lee RC, Ambros V. An extensive class of small RNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans. Science. 2001;294(5543):862-4.
    [18]
    Woolbright BL, Choudhary D, Mikhalyuk A, Trammel C, Shanmugam S, Abbott E, et al. The Role of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-4 (PDK4) in Bladder Cancer and Chemoresistance. Mol Cancer Ther. 2018;17(9):2004-12.
    [19]
    Sun S, Liu J, Zhao M, Han Y, Chen P, Mo Q, et al. Loss of the novel mitochondrial protein FAM210B promotes metastasis via PDK4-dependent metabolic reprogramming. Cell Death Dis. 2017;8(6):e2870.
    [20]
    Choiniere J, Wu J, Wang L. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4 Deficiency Results in Expedited Cellular Proliferation through E2F1-Mediated Increase of Cyclins. Mol Pharmacol. 2017;91(3):189-96.
    [21]
    Han H, Li W, Shen H, Zhang J, Zhu Y, Li Y. microRNA-129-5p, a c-Myc negative target, affects hepatocellular carcinoma progression by blocking the Warburg effect. J Mol Cell Biol. 2016.
    [22]
    Yang J, Yang Q, Yu J, Li X, Yu S, Zhang X. SPOCK1 promotes the proliferation, migration and invasion of glioma cells through PI3K/AKT and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathways. Oncol Rep. 2016;35(6):3566-76.
    [23]
    Chen D, Zhou H, Liu G, Zhao Y, Cao G, Liu Q. SPOCK1 promotes the invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer through Slug-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition. J Cell Mol Med. 2018;22(2):797-807.
    [24]
    Veenstra VL, Damhofer H, Waasdorp C, Steins A, Kocher HM, Medema JP, et al. Stromal SPOCK1 supports invasive pancreatic cancer growth. Mol Oncol. 2017;11(8):1050-64.
    [25]
    Kachaev ZM, Lebedeva LA, Kozlov EN, Toropygin IY, Schedl P, Shidlovskii YV. Paip2 is localized to active promoters and loaded onto nascent mRNA in Drosophila. Cell Cycle. 2018;17(14):1708-20.
    [26]
    Rosenfeld AB. Suppression of cellular transformation by poly (A) binding protein interacting protein 2 (Paip2). PLoS One. 2011;6(9):e25116.
  • Open Access Research Article
    Export citation: APA   BibTeX   EndNote   RIS  
    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2019, 4(3), 106-110. http://doi.org/10.31586/Cancers.0403.03
    107 Views 113 Downloads PDF Full-text (689.500 KB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    Objective: This study aimed to determine whether perioperative antiviral treatment is facilitate for patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and Child-Pugh grade A cirrhosis in perioperative recovery of liver function and HBV activation. Methods: The study included 115 patients with HBV-related HCC and Child-Pugh grade A cirrhosis
    [...] Read more.
    Objective: This study aimed to determine whether perioperative antiviral treatment is facilitate for patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and Child-Pugh grade A cirrhosis in perioperative recovery of liver function and HBV activation. Methods: The study included 115 patients with HBV-related HCC and Child-Pugh grade A cirrhosis who underwent resection. Patients were prospectively assigned to a preoperative antiviral treatment group (n = 51) or postoperative antiviral treatment group (n = 52); twelve patients who had not received antiviral treatment before and after surgery were designated a non-treatment group (n = 12). HBV reactivation during a month after the operation was defined as a HBV DNA value tenfold over preoperative values. Postoperative liver dysfunction was defined as prothrombin activity <50% and serum bilirubin >50 mmol/L on postoperative day 5. Results: Postoperatively, liver dysfunction was present in 1 of 51 (1.96%) patients who received preoperative antiviral therapy, 1 of 52 (1.92%) who received postoperative therapy, and 3 of 12 (25%) who received no antiviral therapy. HBV reactivation postoperatively occurred at similar rates. Conclusions: Preoperative and postoperative antiviral treatment of patients with Child-Pugh grade A cirrhosis and high levels of HBV DNA undergoing hepatic resection for HCC are both facilitate in preventing perioperative liver dysfunction and reactivation of HBV. Thus, in this population with high levels of HBV DNA, perioperative antiviral treatment is important.  Full article
    References
    [1]
    Huang L, Li J, Yan J, Sun J, Zhang X, Wu M, et al. Antiviral therapy decreases viral reactivation in patients with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing hepatectomy: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of viral hepatitis. 2013;20(5):336-342.
    [2]
    Kuzuya T, Katano Y, Kumada T, Toyoda H, Nakano I, Hirooka Y, et al. Efficacy of antiviral therapy with lamivudine after initial treatment for hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma. Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology. 2007;22(11):1929-1935.
    [3]
    Piao CY, Fujioka S, Iwasaki Y, Fujio K, Kaneyoshi T, Araki Y, et al. Lamivudine treatment in patients with HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma--using an untreated, matched control cohort. Acta Med Okayama. 2005;59(5):217-224.
    [4]
    Zhang B, Xu D, Wang R, Zhu P, Mei B, Wei G, et al. Perioperative antiviral therapy improves safety in patients with hepatitis B related HCC following hepatectomy. Int J Surg. 2015;15:1-5.
    [5]
    Huang G, Lai EC, Lau WY, Zhou WP, Shen F, Pan ZY, et al. Posthepatectomy HBV reactivation in hepatitis B-related hepatocellular carcinoma influences postoperative survival in patients with preoperative low HBV-DNA levels. Annals of surgery. 2013;257(3):490-505.
    [6]
    Shuqun C, Mengchao W, Han C, Feng S, Jiahe Y, Wenming C, et al. Antiviral therapy using lamivudine and thymosin alpha1 for hepatocellular carcinoma coexisting with chronic hepatitis B infection. Hepatogastroenterology. 2006;53(68):249-252.
    [7]
    Li N, Lai EC, Shi J, Guo WX, Xue J, Huang B, et al. A comparative study of antiviral therapy after resection of hepatocellular carcinoma in the immune-active phase of hepatitis B virus infection. Annals of surgical oncology. 2010;17(1):179-185.
    [8]
    Chuma M, Hige S, Kamiyama T, Meguro T, Nagasaka A, Nakanishi K, et al. The influence of hepatitis B DNA level and antiviral therapy on recurrence after initial curative treatment in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Journal of gastroenterology. 2009;44(9):991-999.
    [9]
    Chan AC, Chok KS, Yuen WK, Chan SC, Poon RT, Lo CM, et al. Impact of antiviral therapy on the survival of patients after major hepatectomy for hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma. Arch Surg. 2011;146(6):675-681.
    [10]
    Zhou Y, Zhang Z, Zhao Y, Wu L, Li B. Antiviral therapy decreases recurrence of hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma after curative resection: a meta-analysis. World journal of surgery. 2014;38(9):2395-2402.
    [11]
    Sakamoto K, Beppu T, Hayashi H, Nakagawa S, Okabe H, Nitta H, et al. Antiviral therapy and long-term outcome for hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma after curative liver resection in a Japanese cohort. Anticancer Res. 2015;35(3):1647-1655.
    [12]
    Chong CC, Wong GL, Wong VW, Ip PC, Cheung YS, Wong J, et al. Antiviral therapy improves post-hepatectomy survival in patients with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma: a prospective-retrospective study. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2015;41(2):199-208.
    [13]
    Wu CY, Lin JT, Ho HJ, Su CW, Lee TY, Wang SY, et al. Association of nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy with reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic hepatitis B: a nationwide cohort study. Gastroenterology. 2014;147(1):143-151 e145.
    [14]
    Ke Y, Ma L, You XM, Huang SX, Liang YR, Xiang BD, et al. Antiviral therapy for hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma after radical hepatectomy. Cancer biology & medicine. 2013;10(3):158-164.
    [15]
    Kubo S, Tanaka H, Takemura S, Yamamoto S, Hai S, Ichikawa T, et al. Effects of lamivudine on outcome after liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with active replication of hepatitis B virus. Hepatology research : the official journal of the Japan Society of Hepatology. 2007;37(2):94-100.
    [16]
    Wei Q, Xu X, Ling Q, Zhou B, Zheng SS. Perioperative antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B-related hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int. 2013;12(3):251-255.
    [17]
    Sarin SK, Kumar M, Lau GK, Abbas Z, Chan HL, Chen CJ, et al. Asian-Pacific clinical practice guidelines on the management of hepatitis B: a 2015 update. Hepatol Int. 2016;10(1):1-98.
    [18]
    Liaw YF, Kao JH, Piratvisuth T, Chan HL, Chien RN, Liu CJ, et al. Asian-Pacific consensus statement on the management of chronic hepatitis B: a 2012 update. Hepatol Int. 2012;6(3):531-561.
    [19]
    Balzan S, Belghiti J, Farges O, Ogata S, Sauvanet A, Delefosse D, et al. The "50-50 criteria" on postoperative day 5: an accurate predictor of liver failure and death after hepatectomy. Annals of surgery. 2005;242(6):824-828, discussion 828-829.
    [20]
    Dan JQ, Zhang YJ, Huang JT, Chen MS, Gao HJ, Peng ZW, et al. Hepatitis B virus reactivation after radiofrequency ablation or hepatic resection for HBV-related small hepatocellular carcinoma: a retrospective study. European journal of surgical oncology : the journal of the European Society of Surgical Oncology and the British Association of Surgical Oncology. 2013;39(8):865-872.
    [21]
    Lee JI, Kim JK, Chang HY, Lee JW, Kim JM, Chung HJ, et al. Impact of postoperative hepatitis B virus reactivation in hepatocellular carcinoma patients who formerly had naturally suppressed virus. Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology. 2014;29(5):1019-1027.
    [22]
    Huang L, Li J, Lau WY, Yan J, Zhou F, Liu C, et al. Perioperative reactivation of hepatitis B virus replication in patients undergoing partial hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma. Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology. 2012;27(1):158-164.
    [23]
    Wang JP, Kao FY, Wu CY, Hung YP, Chao Y, Chou YJ, et al. Nucleos(t)ide analogues associated with a reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in hepatitis B patients: a population-based cohort study. Cancer. 2015;121(9):1446-1455.
    [24]
    Xia BW, Zhang YC, Wang J, Ding FH, He XD. Efficacy of antiviral therapy with nucleotide/nucleoside analogs after curative treatment for patients with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Clinics and research in hepatology and gastroenterology. 2015; 39(4):458-68.
Filter options
Publication Date
From to
Refine Publication Date
Subject Areas
Refine Subjects
Article Types
Refine Article Types
Countries / Territories
Refine Countries / Territories